All posts related to KL Conference on Islamic Wealth Management & Financial Planning 2016 - KLC-IWM-2017

Friday, 24 June 2011

Islamic Real Estate Investment Trusts (i-REITs)

REIT is an investment vehicle that proposes to invest at least 50 percent of its total assets in real estate, whether through direct ownership or through a single purpose company whose principle asset comprises of real asset. 

The issuance of the real estate investment trusts (REITs) guidelines by the SC (to replace the existing property trust fund guidelines) has helped kick-start the REITs industry in Malaysia. Subsequently, the SC released the Guidelines for Islamic Real Estate Investment Trusts (I-REITs Guidelines) to facilitate the introduction of Shariah-compliant REITs. 

Malaysia became the first jurisdiction in the global financial sector to issue the I-REITs Guidelines. The I-REITs Guidelines was set as the global benchmark for the development of I-REITs. The thrust of the I-REITs Guidelines is to provide clear guidance on and new investment opportunities in collective real estate investments through a Shariah-compliant capital market instrument. 

(MIFC)

Tuesday, 21 June 2011

Islamic Exchange Traded Fund (ETF)

ETFs are essentially unit trust funds that are listed and traded on a stock exchange. They are open-ended with a unique in-kind creation and redemption mechanism supported by a system of participating dealers and liquidity providers. The difference between ETFs and unit trust funds is in the manner their units are bought and sold.


ETFs are listed and therefore their units can be bought and sold anytime during stock exchange trading hours. Investors buy and sell ETF units through their stockbroker rather than through unit trust agents. ETFs are index tracking fund. Most ETFs are passively managed index funds although there is ongoing work being done to create enhanced and actively managed ETFs. In the managing of index funds passively, managers do not pick stocks based on fundamental analysis. Instead, managers aim to track the performance of a benchmark index.



Islamic ETFs and conventional ETFs share common characteristics. The main difference between a conventional ETF and Islamic ETF is the benchmark index that the Islamic ETF tracks. An Islamic ETF only tracks an Islamic benchmark index where the index constituents comprise of companies which are Shariah-compliant. The provision for the establishment of Islamic ETF is embedded in the Guidelines on Exchange-Traded Funds. On 22 January 2008, Malaysia launched the region's first Shariah-compliant ETF. 


(MIFC)


http://islamic-wealth-management.net

Sunday, 5 June 2011

Malaysia’s Value Propositions - International Islamic Bank


Malaysia's in-depth experience and solid fundamentals in Islamic finance developed over more than 30 years, offers strong value propositions to foreign financial institutions to establish Islamic banking operations in Malaysia to conduct foreign currency business.


Well-Developed Market

Malaysia has placed an equal emphasis on the four core sectors in Islamic finance - Islamic banking, takaful, Islamic capital market as well as Islamic capital and money market. Malaysia's long track record of building a successful domestic Islamic financial industry of over 30 years gives the country a solid foundation - financial bedrock of stability that adds to the richness, diversity and maturity of the financial system. Presently, Malaysia's Islamic banking assets reached USD72.5 billion with an average growth rate 20% annually.

The rapid liberalisation in the Islamic finance industry has encouraged foreign financial institutions' to make Malaysia their destination of choice. This has created a diverse and growing community of local and international financial institutions. 

Currently, Malaysia has a significant number of full fledged Islamic banks including several foreign owned entities; conventional institutions who have established Islamic subsidiaries and also entities who are conducting foreign currency business. All financial institutions are given permission to conduct both ringgit and foreign currency businesses. 

Foreign financial institutions can also leverage on the Islamic money market (IMM) in Malaysia, which provides Islamic financial institutions with the facility for funding and adjusting portfolios in the short-term. 

The IMM's unique advantage is that it allows surplus banks to channel funds to deficit banks, thereby maintaining the funding and liquidity of the Islamic banking system to ensure stability. Islamic financial institutions, whether foreign or domestic, can also match their funding requirement through the Islamic Interbank Money Market (IIMM).

Foreign financial institutions also benefit from Malaysia's thriving environment consisting of a wide range of innovative Islamic banking products and services.

Malaysia's existing expertise and experience in this area of Islamic finance enables foreign financial institutions to also efficiently and cost effectively structure their own innovative offerings. Ultimately, the benefit is a shorter learning curve, quicker time to market and reduced costs for new entrants to Malaysia's Islamic banking industry.



Adopt Global Legal and Regulatory Best Practices

Malaysia's legal framework caters for Islamic finance matters. There is a dedicated judge at the High Court level for Islamic finance matters. The Kuala Lumpur Regional Centre for Arbitration has specific capabilities to deal with Islamic contract matters. This legal framework enables the enforceability of Shariah-based contracts for Islamic finance while providing governance and legal redress for Islamic financial institutions.

The Malaysian Islamic banking industry is governed by the Islamic Banking Act 1983, which provides for licensing, regulation and supervision of Islamic banking and financial business to ensure that such businesses are carried on at all times in accordance with Shariah principles.

The development of various regulatory guidelines has been instrumental in providing industry consistency and clarity for the operations of Islamic finance in Malaysia. In addition, Malaysia's regulatory guidelines have also set the benchmarks for other countries in developing their own Islamic industry.

Well-Developed Shariah Governance Framework 

The Central Bank of Malaysia (Bank Negara Malaysia) has established a centralised Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) to advise on issues related to Shariah compliance matters pertaining to the Islamic banking and takaful industry. The approach was taken, by recognising the importance of Shariah compliance in the Islamic financial system which possesses distinctive characteristics when compared to the conventional system.

The SAC is responsible for analysing issues on Islamic banking and takaful matter, to ensure the aspects of the operations of Islamic financial institutions are in accordance with Shariah principles. The role of the SAC has been a catalyst in promoting product innovation while ensuring consistency in Shariah interpretations.

Comprehensive Human Capital Development

Malaysia has placed a strong emphasis on human capital development alongside with the development of Islamic finance industry to ensure the availability of Islamic finance talent. As a result, Malaysia has a large and diverse pool of Islamic finance talent comprises product innovators, regulators, intermediaries and risk managers who have both financial and Shariah knowledge and expertise.

Malaysia adopts a structured and comprehensive approach to human capital development in Islamic finance to meet the growing needs of Islamic finance talent by domestic and foreign financial institutions. Several learning institutions offer wide range of Islamic finance training programmes to develop Islamic finance professionals and cultivate Islamic finance thought leadership.



Liberal Foreign Exchange Administration (FEA) Rules

Malaysia's liberalised foreign exchange administration rules enhance Malaysia's competitiveness and business efficiency, while promoting financial and economic stability.

The relaxation in rulings was made in tandem with the readiness of the Malaysian economy to support the country's growth and competitiveness, whilst creating a conducive business environment for international financial institutions.


Tax Neutrality

Tax neutrality has been accorded to Islamic finance instruments and transactions executed to fulfill Shariah requirements. There is no additional stamp duty and tax payment incurred in the usage of Islamic products.
Malaysia's tax neutrality framework is to promote level playing field between conventional and Islamic financial products. Tax neutrality reduces the cost of doing business in Islamic finance, thereby contributing to the overall competitiveness and spurs the development of Islamic finance. (MIFC)

Malaysia's Value Proposition - International Takaful


Malaysia's in-depth experience and solid fundamentals in Islamic finance developed over more than 30 years, offer strong value propositions to foreign financial institutions to establish takaful operations in Malaysia to conduct foreign currency business. 

Well-Developed Market

Malaysia has placed an equal emphasis on the four core sectors in Islamic finance – Islamic banking, takaful, Islamic capital market as well as Islamic money market. Malaysia is one of the leading takaful market and has been experiencing rapid growth. As at 2008, total assets of Malaysia's takaful industry amounted to USD3 billion, with market penetration of 7.5%. Takaful assets and net contributions experienced strong growth with an average annual growth rate of 21% and 29% respectively from 2004 to 20081.

The rapid liberalisation of Malaysia's Islamic finance industry has encouraged foreign institutions' participation in Malaysia, thus creating a diverse and growing community of domestic and international takaful operators that have acknowledged experience in the takaful industry. Currently, there are eight takaful operators and four retakaful operators, with five foreign participations from the UK, Bahrain, Germany and Japan. These takaful operators conduct both domestic and foreign currency business.

Adopt Global Legal and Regulatory Best Practices

Malaysia's legal framework caters for Islamic finance matters. There is a dedicated judge at the High Court level for Islamic finance matters. The Kuala Lumpur Regional Centre for Arbitration has specific capabilities to deal with Islamic contract matters. This legal framework enables the enforceability of Islamic finance contracts while providing strong governance and legal redress for Islamic financial institutions. 

The Malaysian takaful industry is governed by the Takaful Act 1984, which provides the legislative framework for the licensing and regulation of takaful businesses to ensure the businesses are in accordance with the Shariah principles.

The development of various regulatory guidelines has been instrumental in providing consistency and clarity for the operations of Islamic finance in Malaysia. In addition, Malaysia's Islamic regulatory guidelines have also set the benchmarks for other countries in developing their own Islamic industry.

Well-Developed Shariah Governance Framework 

The Central Bank of Malaysia (Bank Negara Malaysia) has established a centralised Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) to advise on issues related to Shariah compliance matters pertaining to the Islamic banking and takaful industry. The approach was taken, by recognising the importance of Shariah compliance in the Islamic financial system which possesses distinctive characteristics when compared to the conventional system.

The SAC is responsible for analysing issues on Islamic banking and takaful matter, to ensure the aspects of the operations of Islamic financial institutions are in accordance with Shariah principles. 



Comprehensive Human Capital Development 

Malaysia has placed a strong emphasis on human capital development alongside with the development of Islamic finance industry to ensure the availability of Islamic finance talent. As a result, Malaysia has a large and diverse pool of Islamic finance talent comprises product innovators, regulators, intermediaries and risk managers who have both financial and Shariah knowledge and expertise. 

Malaysia adopts a structured and comprehensive approach to human capital development in Islamic finance to meet the growing needs of Islamic finance talent by domestic and foreign financial institutions. Several learning institutions offer wide range of Islamic finance training programmes to develop Islamic finance professionals and cultivate Islamic finance thought leadership. 

Liberal Foreign Exchange Administration (FEA) Rules

Malaysia's liberalised foreign exchange administration rules enhance Malaysia's competitiveness and business efficiency, while promoting financial and economic stability. 

The relaxation in rulings was made in tandem with the readiness of the Malaysian economy to support the country's growth and competitiveness, whilst creating conducive business environment for foreign financial institutions. (MIFC)

Thursday, 2 June 2011

Malaysia's Value Propositions - Islamic Fund and Wealth Management


Malaysia's in-depth experience and solid fundamentals in Islamic finance developed over more than 30 years, offers strong value propositions to foreign fund managers to establish Islamic fund management operations in Malaysia.


Strategic Location

Malaysia, with its strategic location serves as a link between the East and West. The country is well-positioned to facilitate cross flow of funds and greater economic linkages between South East Asia and the Middle East. Foreign players who wish to seize the opportunity of these largely untapped and fast growing markets will find Malaysia an excellent gateway for this purpose.

As the economies of these regions continue expanding, Malaysia is expected to play a pivotal role as a regional financial hub and gateway, particularly for transnational investments and the sourcing of funds.

Through its various global economic interlinkages, Malaysia provides players with access to the financial pipelines of the region to tap surplus funds and the wealth of high net worth investors.

Adopt Global Legal and Regulatory Best Practices

Malaysia's legal framework caters for Islamic finance matters. There is a dedicated judge at the High Court level for Islamic finance matters. The Kuala Lumpur Regional Centre for Arbitration has specific capabilities to deal with Islamic contract matters. This legal framework enables the enforceability of Shariah based contracts for Islamic finance while providing governance and legal redress for Islamic financial institutions. It also provides for strong investor protection

In particular, the Capital Market Services Act 2007 (CMSA) defines the parameters for permitted capital market activities in Malaysia, while reinforcing the protection framework and promoting international best practices among financial institutions. These and other such regulatory guidelines have been instrumental in providing industry consistency and clarity for the Islamic Capital Market (ICM) in Malaysia. In addition, Malaysia's regulatory guidelines have also set benchmarks for other countries in developing their own Islamic Capital Markets (ICM).

The legal and regulatory framework is constantly reviewed taking into consideration latest market, products and Shariah issues to ensure continuous development in the ICM. 

Well-Developed Shariah Governance Framework 

The Securities Commission Malaysia (SC) has established a Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) to advise on issues related to the Islamic Capital Market (ICM). The approach was taken, by recognising the importance of Shariah compliance in the Islamic financial system which possesses distinctive characteristics when compared to the conventional system.

The SAC is also responsible for analysing specific issues related to the operations of ICM, to provide guidance and advise to investors, the government and industry.



Malaysia's in-depth experience and solid fundamentals in Islamic finance developed over more than 30 years, offers strong value propositions to foreign fund managers to establish Islamic fund management operations in Malaysia.


Strategic Location

Malaysia, with its strategic location serves as a link between the East and West. The country is well-positioned to facilitate cross flow of funds and greater economic linkages between South East Asia and the Middle East. Foreign players who wish to seize the opportunity of these largely untapped and fast growing markets will find Malaysia an excellent gateway for this purpose.

As the economies of these regions continue expanding, Malaysia is expected to play a pivotal role as a regional financial hub and gateway, particularly for transnational investments and the sourcing of funds.

Through its various global economic interlinkages, Malaysia provides players with access to the financial pipelines of the region to tap surplus funds and the wealth of high net worth investors.

Adopt Global Legal and Regulatory Best Practices

Malaysia's legal framework caters for Islamic finance matters. There is a dedicated judge at the High Court level for Islamic finance matters. The Kuala Lumpur Regional Centre for Arbitration has specific capabilities to deal with Islamic contract matters. This legal framework enables the enforceability of Shariah based contracts for Islamic finance while providing governance and legal redress for Islamic financial institutions. It also provides for strong investor protection

In particular, the Capital Market Services Act 2007 (CMSA) defines the parameters for permitted capital market activities in Malaysia, while reinforcing the protection framework and promoting international best practices among financial institutions. These and other such regulatory guidelines have been instrumental in providing industry consistency and clarity for the Islamic Capital Market (ICM) in Malaysia. In addition, Malaysia's regulatory guidelines have also set benchmarks for other countries in developing their own Islamic Capital Markets (ICM).

The legal and regulatory framework is constantly reviewed taking into consideration latest market, products and Shariah issues to ensure continuous development in the ICM. 

Well-Developed Shariah Governance Framework 

The Securities Commission Malaysia (SC) has established a Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) to advise on issues related to the Islamic Capital Market (ICM). The approach was taken, by recognising the importance of Shariah compliance in the Islamic financial system which possesses distinctive characteristics when compared to the conventional system.

The SAC is also responsible for analysing specific issues related to the operations of ICM, to provide guidance and advise to investors, the government and industry. (MIFC)